Stone inlay on purple heart wine stopper

Stone inlay on purple heart wine stopper

Natural Expressions Inc ©

"Bulk Rock Slabs Cabs"

"Crushed and Pulverized Material"

13802 E. Williams Field Rd.

Gilbert, AZ 85295

Phone: (480) - 963-6552

Fred Thiele

Slabs, Geodes, and Crushed stone Inlay work.

Stone Inlay in Purpleheart

Amethyst

Amethyst is a violet variety of quartz often used in jewelry. The name comes from the Ancient Greek a- (“not”) and μέθυστος methustos (“intoxicated”), a reference to the belief that the stone protected its owner from drunkenness. The ancient Greeks and Romans wore amethyst and made drinking vessels of it in the belief that it would prevent intoxication. It is one of several forms of quartz. Amethyst is the traditional birthstone for February.

Quartz and Honeycomb calcite with back lighting.

Bellevue Rock Show Purchase

Approx. 10 lb. Chunk of Brazilian Amethyst.
Some of my collection.

Some of my collection.

Biggs Jasper Cabochon, todays playing in the garage.

Biggs jasper, picture rock is noted to be one of the finest picture jaspers.  The slabs of Biggs jasper picture rock show reddish brown and tan hills, cliffs, or mountains. The material is very similar to Deschutes picture jasper.  The Biggs slabs are very solid, but may contain a few vugs, or small crystalline pockets.  Biggs jasper is rare to find in the rough since this was highly sought after many years ago when discovered

Biggs Jasper Cabochon, todays playing in the garage.

Biggs jasper, picture rock is noted to be one of the finest picture jaspers.  The slabs of Biggs jasper picture rock show reddish brown and tan hills, cliffs, or mountains. The material is very similar to Deschutes picture jasper.  The Biggs slabs are very solid, but may contain a few vugs, or small crystalline pockets.  Biggs jasper is rare to find in the rough since this was highly sought after many years ago when discovered

Everett Rock and Gem Show Sept 29, 2012 Findings.

Todays Stone: Petoskey stone

A Petoskey stone is a rock and a fossil, often pebble-shaped, that is composed of a fossilized coral, Hexagonaria percarinata.[1] The stones were formed as a result of glaciation, in which sheets of ice plucked stones from the bedrock, grinding off their rough edges and depositing them in Michigan's Upper Peninsula, and the northwestern (and some in the northeastern) portion of Michigan's lower peninsula. In some areas of Michigan, complete fossilized coral colony heads can be found.

Petoskey stones are found in the Gravel Point Formation of the Traverse Group. They are fragments of a coral reef that was originally deposited during the Devonian period. [1] When dry, the stone resembles ordinary limestone but when wet or polished using lapidary techniques, the distinctive mottled pattern of the six-sided coral fossils emerges. It is sometimes made into decorative objects. Other forms of fossilized coral are also found in the same location.

In 1965, it was named the state stone of Michigan.

Orange Calcite Tumbling media.
Tumble for a short period to time to smooth out the rough edges.  Then to get a nice shine, dip the calcite in Muriatic acid for about 1 min.  Rinse with water immediately, and you should have a nice shine on the calcite.
You can find Muriatic acid at any pool supply store or most home improvement stores.

Orange Calcite Tumbling media.

Tumble for a short period to time to smooth out the rough edges.  Then to get a nice shine, dip the calcite in Muriatic acid for about 1 min.  Rinse with water immediately, and you should have a nice shine on the calcite.

You can find Muriatic acid at any pool supply store or most home improvement stores.

Todays Stone: Calcite

Calcite crystals are trigonal-rhombohedral, though actual calcite rhombohedra are rare as natural crystals. However, they show a remarkable variety of habits including acute to obtuse rhombohedra, tabular forms, prisms, or various scalenohedra. Calcite exhibits several twinning types adding to the variety of observed forms. It may occur as fibrous, granular, lamellar, or compact. Cleavage is usually in three directions parallel to the rhombohedron form. Its fracture is conchoidal, but difficult to obtain.

It has a defining Mohs hardness of 3, a specific gravity of 2.71, and its luster is vitreous in crystallized varieties. Color is white or none, though shades of gray, red, orange, yellow, green, blue, violet, brown, or even black can occur when the mineral is charged with impurities.

Calcite is transparent to opaque and may occasionally show phosphorescence or fluorescence. A transparent variety called Iceland spar is used for optical purposes. Acute scalenohedral crystals are sometimes referred to as “dogtooth spar” while the rhombohedral form is sometimes referred to as “nailhead spar”.

Single calcite crystals display an optical property called birefringence (double refraction). This strong birefringence causes objects viewed through a clear piece of calcite to appear doubled. The birefringent effect (using calcite) was first described by the Danish scientist Rasmus Bartholin in 1669. At a wavelength of ~590 nm calcite has ordinary and extraordinary refractive indices of 1.658 and 1.486, respectively.[6] Between 190 and 1700 nm, the ordinary refractive index varies roughly between 1.6 and 1.4, while the extraordinary refractive index varies between 1.9 and 1.5.[7]

Calcite, like most carbonates, will dissolve with most forms of acid. Calcite can be either dissolved by groundwater or precipitated by groundwater, depending on several factors including the water temperature, pH, and dissolved ion concentrations. Although calcite is fairly insoluble in cold water, acidity can cause dissolution of calcite and release of carbon dioxide gas. Ambient carbon dioxide, due to its acidity, has a slight solubilizing effect on calcite. Calcite exhibits an unusual characteristic called retrograde solubility in which it becomes less soluble in water as the temperature increases. When conditions are right for precipitation, calcite forms mineral coatings that cement the existing rock grains together or it can fill fractures. When conditions are right for dissolution, the removal of calcite can dramatically increase the porosity and permeability of the rock, and if it continues for a long period of time may result in the formation of caves. On a landscape scale, continued dissolution of calcium carbonate-rich rocks can lead to the expansion and eventual collapse of cave systems, resulting in various forms of karst topography.

New Lortone Dual 6lb Tumbler

New Lortone Dual 6lb Tumbler

Todays Stone: Pyrite

The mineral pyrite, or iron pyrite, is an iron sulfide with the formula FeS2. This mineral’s metallic luster and pale brass-yellow hue have earned it the nickname fool’s gold because of its resemblance to gold. The color has also led to the nicknames brass, brazzle and Brazil, primarily used to refer to pyrite found in coal.[5][6]

Pyrite is the most common of the sulfide minerals. The name pyrite is derived from the Greek πυρίτης (puritēs), “of fire” or “in fire”,[7] in turn from πύρ (pur), “fire”.[8] In ancient Roman times, this name was applied to several types of stone that would create sparks when struck against steel; Pliny the Elder described one of them as being brassy, almost certainly a reference to what we now call pyrite.[9] By Georgius Agricola's time, the term had become a generic term for all of the sulfide minerals.[10]

Pyrite is usually found associated with other sulfides or oxides in quartz veins, sedimentary rock, and metamorphic rock, as well as in coal beds, and as a replacement mineral in fossils. Despite being nicknamed fool’s gold, pyrite is sometimes found in association with small quantities of gold. Gold and arsenic occur as a coupled substitution in the pyrite structure. In the Carlin–type gold deposits, arsenian pyrite contains up to 0.37 wt% gold.[11]